Feedback: The fairy tale of Cinderella-feminist and her love for rallying in Audi’s campaign #EverAfter

CinderellaAudi

No matter how much we talk about a dialogue with consumers, in practice, it is almost nonexistent. In the era of likes without dislikes, marketing is in a blissful ignorance of what it brings to the world and whether it brings anything more than information noise. Our new goal is to investigate the consumers’ reaction to brand campaigns under the heading “Feedback”. In real relationships sharing joys and discussion about difficulties are equally important. And we stand for love between lady Reality and gentleman Marketing.

The first hero of new heading is Audi Spain and its campaign #EverAfter (in Spanish version – #PorSiempreJamás), developed by the Proximity Barcelona agency. The 5-minute commercial, released on December 15, shortly before Christmas, combines the recognizable stories of few fairy tales closest to a girl’s heart: Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red Riding Hood. Loving dad reads to his daughter the story about the long-awaited meeting of the princess with the prince at the ball, where … rallying takes place. It’s better to watch first:

The story of “the first girl at the ball” is dedicated to Michèle Mouton, the only female winner of the World Rally Championship stages (the first triumph – San Remo, 1981), the most titled woman in the history of motorsport.

Photo: Michèle Mouton, personbio.com

The life scenario of “the French beauty and the German monster” (cult Audi Quattro, which Michèle ruled) is worthy not only shooting a commercial or a feature film but also writing a new fairy tale of the Cinderellas of our time to future generations. A refined Frenchwoman just pulled out the roots of all stereotypes about motorsport of the second half of the 20th century. American drivers who heard that in Pikes Peak or “Race to the clouds” on the very dangerous mountain road in Colorado, will participate the four-wheel drive German Audi, come from this in a rage, and learning that there will be a woman as a driver, lost ground under wheels of their cars. About how they felt, when this woman overtook them year after year, even to speak is not necessary. Michèle responded to permanent attacks with a delicate and intelligent humor: “If you want to prove yourself as a man, maybe you should ride a race with me from the mountain?”. And only once Michèle Mouton failed in competition with herself, as she calls rallying, – in the day when right before the start of the Ivory Coast Rally in 1982 she was informed that her father had left this world. “People thought I was upset because I lost the title. But I didn’t care about the title. It was my father I was upset about.”

In a race for women’s rights, Michèle Mouton, however, is not included, despite her distinguished career as a public figure. When asked about her motivation, Michèle is very clear that she never tried to prove herself as a woman in a man’s world.

 “For me, we are men and women. We are different. I don’t want to be a man and I don’t want them to be women either. I have never had a problem with this. I have enough personality to know that in rallying, this” — she points to her watch — “is the most important thing. The time.”

Michèle took part in the campaign and told her personal story about first victories and love for her dad in the accompanying video “The real story that inspired #EverAfter”.

The controversial plot of the ad could not but arouse our interest in how the public took a “punch” at inmost traditions and Audi’s attempt to rethink them in the key of feminism.

The love of one half of humanity for cars, and the other for fairy tales, of course, did not leave the film without attention: exactly one month after the release (15/12 – 15/01) it was viewed by 1,620,315 people. Youtube, which allows the public to express not only a positive attitude, shows the ratio of sympathy and antipathy 3:1 (3 thousand like, a thousand – no).

Instagram and Twitter remained practically without any excitement around the story about Michèle Mouton and her advertising character: there were only a couple dozens of reposts with comments, the most significant of which expressed support for Audi in its fight against traditions: “As the #EverAfter shows, the use of another type of advertising content for children, responsible and without stereotypes, is quite real.” The Spanish audience took the story as organic for its environment and inspiring, especially on Christmas and New Year holidays. Among the wider audience, the video has not yet found its fans, but its potential for capturing the attention of people drawing inspiration from feminism is very high.

It would be incredibly interesting for us to assess your attitude to such marketing pitch. We will be glad to receive feedback and to feel this phantom, but very hoped-for dialogue with consumers.

Quotation source: Michèle Mouton’s interview for the Telegraph.